Why Do You Wear Hijaab?

Anonymous said...

today a lady stopped me and told me that my head scarf and my clothes were contradicting. is that a sign?

9:26 AM


Amaana03 replied:

Do you think that what she said had merit? If you feel that what you were wearing today was not 100% reflecting piety, modesty and purity...then maybe it wasn't the best outfit to wear. Hijaab is not just something that we wear on the outside...it is also on the inside...you have to make sure that you have that same purity on your insides...we are in continuous struggle to do this.

I have to admit...this happens to ALL of us...sometimes you just feel that what you are wearing isn't right...you kind of feel a little exposed. I have to say though...if you have felt exposed once and then the next time you wore the same or similar outfit...then maybe you are making it easier and easier for yourself to wear what you shouldn't. A lot of times we want to fit into this society without really knowing it (sometimes fully knowing it)...but I have to ask you a question (which I also ask myself): Do you want to be like everyone else? On the Day of Judgment do you want to follow suit with everyone else? My answer is always and hopefully will always be "No" because I am Muslim...I am unique....I am special...and so are you.

Another test that I give myself before I leave in the morning is...what if I were to die today...would I want this to be the last thing that I wear? I know that sounds very morbid...but honestly, as youth we forget to think about death...but let me tell you something...you want a reality check...think of death.

Side Note: Think of the Sahabiyaat (the female companions of the Prophet SAAWS) or Maryam (AS)...can you see them in something like today's outfit? We want to be like these women...these should be our role models...so ask yourself that question :)

I hope that helps! May Allah (SWT) lead us on the Right Path. Ameen.


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