Rejuvenation

I have been around for 29 years. I think it is about time for me to be true to my identity. I have lived a lot of my life wondering whether I belong in Egypt (where my family is originally from) or whether I belong in America. I have to say that after these 29 years...drum roll please...the result of all my contemplation is that I belong in America...because, guess what, I am American, and I have always been.

How do you know when you belong to a place? You know when you actually miss that place when you're not there. I miss America when I'm not here. I feel obligated to making this country the best country in the world because I am a citizen of this country. Just as my ancesters cared about their motherlands, I too want the best for my home.

Ahh how peaceful my soul has become after the verdict of belonging some place. Pretty refreshing if you ask me :) I'm sure you can relate.

Comments

  1. Well, What relief !! Whew ! Being from multiple backgrounds can be confusing but what makes it so precious is that you have the best of both worlds, or 3 or 4 worlds. You will never be just an American because you have the ability to appreciate your other culture unlike someone who is just American will. And you will never be just from any other named country because you will appreciate the American culture unlike someone who isn't American can. While away from America you will always miss the comforts and familiarness that you belong to. And when you are away from pretty much any other country, you will always miss the authenticity that is rare to find in America. Embrace ALL that you have. The more the merrier :)After all, being brought up with both influences is what made you who you are ;)

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  2. In my 31 years, I have found that the whole world, not just America is becoming one big melting pot. It is not as tabboo as it used to be to marry someone outside your race, religion or ethnic bakground and with the improving of communication through technology, different cultures have become closer toghether and people have become more educated and aware of each other in differences and similarities. More and more we are becomming one. A stronger one, a more educated one, and a more united one. In conclusion, we are all citizens of the world and the rest of the seperating lines have beccome a blur. We are all obligated to leaving the world a beter place for the future inhabitants. We must care about the survival of existing humans all over the world. When we send donations to help reconstruct, cure hunger, build homes, save orphans, we are not rooting for one team but as a whole unit despite what part of the world the pieces of that unit are in. My advice. Don't sweat the small stuff ;)

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  3. Yup I feel a lot more American than Egyptian. My recent first trip to Egypt reinforced this feeling. Of course, getting to know my family and learning the history of my roots was totally awesome. But, the entire time I was there I yearned to come back home. It bothers me that I wanted to leave this "other" country so badly. Why did my siblings not feel the same way? Why do I, an Arab hijabi, feel more comfortable walking the streets of NY than the streets of Cairo? Oh, and yes Mona, we alluded to this the other night...why did my sis and I feel like we had nothing in common with our female cousins?...we communicated more with the guys than the gals:/ You've been to Egypt several times...do your impressions and sentiments change?

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  5. The reason I felt like writing this entry was 1. It got us to think (which is so awesome) and 2. Because I really do feel like a person has to belong to a place to really own it.

    I sincerely feel that my roots have made me who I am today, but I also have to accept that I wouldn't be who I am today had I not grown up in America. This country is full of so many beautiful benefits for us to take advantage of. We have so many freedoms that are not found in many countries around the world. This said, there are benefits to being able to taste the beautiful flavors of said countries.

    I do agree with comments 1 and 2. We are a people that are raised to accept all walks of life and cultures. The melting pot in my eyes is not a pot that melts all our flavors away...it brings those beautiful flavors OUT and makes us appreciate one another for just that. A lot of countries are made up of homogenous communities. If you are not one of them then you are strange (no matter how long you have been there). I know of many places in Europe that aren't as accepting to people of different races and ethnicities. I guess that is where one really thanks God for being brought up in a society that cherishes our differences.

    It used to hurt feeling that when I would go to Egypt I was "the American" and when I would come back I'd be "the Egyptian"...can you see where the identity-crisis might just bite you in the butt (sorry...lol)? I feel that my not knowing where I belonged made me shelter myself. It stunted my hopes to grow; it gave me an excuse not to do more. Now I know better 

    AlaMo, I think a big part of the dilemma of relating to people overseas is that we don't live there. We know that when we visit we are mere transients. I guess we get a bit of a culture shock. By the time we start to understand the societal norms, it's time to leave.

    I also think that because we expect to relate to the women more, it just doesn't work out. We try so hard to find common ground. A lot of times, with the opposite gender, we don't even try to find those grounds (we might but not as hard)...making it easier to get along because we know that the reasons why we might not completely understand one another is due to gender and not culture of upbringing...does that make sense?

    Really deep down inside, I feel that we are put in a place to make a difference, no matter where that place may be. It is an obligation to make it a better place because all land is holy; all of it belongs to God.

    ~Mona

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  6. I love you Mona, you are a true true friend. Alhumdulilah!
    love,
    Farhana K

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  7. Thanks Sweet Farhana...I'm happy you're reading :)!!

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  8. My sisters name is MOna, she's my fav. Well, I'm from TEXAS and living here in UAE. I wondered where I belonged, too. AFter living here for almost three years, I came to the conclusion. I belong here, where my husband and kids are. I have a post on this..

    http://texaninuae.blogspot.com/2010/01/uae-is-my-home.html

    go read there. :)))

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